Gender Selection Center

IVF and PGD

November 11, 2011 | posted in: Articles | by

IVF and PGD are terms that go hand in hand – but why, and what do they really mean? IVF stands for in vitro fertilization. It’s a type of artificial impregnation method for couples who find it hard to conceive through natural means (and it has also now become a popular way for gay couples to have children). PGD stands for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, which is the only 100% successful method for selecting the gender of a baby. Let’s look more closely at exactly how IVF and PGD work, and why they’re so closely related to each other.

How IVF Works

To really understand PGD, what it is and why it exists you first need to understand IVF. In vitro fertilization is simply a process where the egg is fertilized outside the mother’s body. It’s used in a number of scenarios, but generally it’s used by couples who can’t conceived naturally because of fertility problems with either the man or woman.

An IVF baby (otherwise known as a ‘test tube baby’) can carry the genetic material of one parent, both parents or neither of the parents. If the mother is infertile, for existence, the embryo can be created by fertilizing a donated egg with sperm from the father.

The process itself is complex and expensive and typically requires a series of fertility drugs be taken by the mother-to-be.

IVF shouldn’t be viewed as a guaranteed procedure – in fact the pregnancy rate for women under the age of 35 is less than 50%. The likelihood of a successful implant declines the older the mother is.

How PGD Works

PGD was originally developed to allow doctors to screen an embryo for genetic problems before it was implanted into the mother’s womb via IVF. This was to help ensure mothers weren’t implanted with embryos that already carried the genetic code for disorders such as Down syndrome, anemia, or any number of other genetically inherited health problems. Basically, it was a method for helping both parent and potential child avoid a lifetime of struggle.

Of course, the ability to pre-screen for genetic disorders brought with it the ability to see which gender the embryo would develop into. Because gender is determined by the mix of X and Y chromosomes in the embryo, a doctor can figure out what gender the baby will be before the embryo is implanted. That’s why PGD is guaranteed to get the desired gender outcome every time.

IVF and PGD are terms that go hand in hand – but why, and what do they really mean? IVF stands for in vitro fertilization. It’s a type of artificial impregnation method for couples who find it hard to conceive through natural means (and it has also now become a popular way for gay couples to have children). PGD stands for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, which is the only 100% successful method for selecting the gender of a baby. Let’s look more closely at exactly how IVF and PGD work, and why they’re so closely related to each other.

How IVF Works

To really understand PGD, what it is and why it exists you first need to understand IVF. In vitro fertilization is simply a process where the egg is fertilized outside the mother’s body. It’s used in a number of scenarios, but generally it’s used by couples who can’t conceived naturally because of fertility problems with either the man or woman.

An IVF baby (otherwise known as a ‘test tube baby’) can carry the genetic material of one parent, both parents or neither of the parents. If the mother is infertile, for existence, the embryo can be created by fertilizing a donated egg with sperm from the father.

The process itself is complex and expensive and typically requires a series of fertility drugs be taken by the mother-to-be.

IVF shouldn’t be viewed as a guaranteed procedure – in fact the pregnancy rate for women under the age of 35 is less than 50%. The likelihood of a successful implant declines the older the mother is.

How PGD Works

PGD was originally developed to allow doctors to screen an embryo for genetic problems before it was implanted into the mother’s womb via IVF. This was to help ensure mothers weren’t implanted with embryos that already carried the genetic code for disorders such as Down syndrome, anemia, or any number of other genetically inherited health problems. Basically, it was a method for helping both parent and potential child avoid a lifetime of struggle.

Of course, the ability to pre-screen for genetic disorders brought with it the ability to see which gender the embryo would develop into. Because gender is determined by the mix of X and Y chromosomes in the embryo, a doctor can figure out what gender the baby will be before the embryo is implanted. That’s why PGD is guaranteed to get the desired gender outcome every time.

Bookmark and Share

Log in to post a comment.